Slower Traffic in Left Lane May be Traffic Violation

States, including Pennsylvania, make it a traffic violation to travel too slow in the fast lane

Left-lane slowpokes drive you crazy?

The words ‘move over’ — even if readable in the rearview mirror — may not mean much to them, but a ticket might. Some states are cracking down.

By Christopher Solomon

In these days of longer commutes and simmering tempers, nothing seems to set off already-testy motorists like the left-lane camper — the guy or gal who drives in the passing lane and bars faster drivers from easily passing. Web sites have cropped up to educate other drivers, or to vent. There’s a (somewhat painful) YouTube song called “Keep Right.”

Even bigwigs get frustrated. Pennsylvania Gov. Edward Rendell, weary of having his limo slowed down by such left-lane pokies, ordered an aide to have the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission install signs a few years ago reading “Keep Right, Pass Left. It’s the Law.”

And now some states are cracking down on left-lane campers, both to keep traffic moving and to tamp down the road rage that goes from zero-to-60 faster than ever before.

That’s not just a pretext. Last year, a driver was arrested on Interstate 79 outside Pittsburgh after allegedly brandishing a semiautomatic pistol at a driver who was on his tail.

You could get a ticket

Some states didn’t allow left-lane lingering but didn’t enforce the law. Now they are.

At the start of the summer, the Washington State Patrol began pulling people over for violating the state’s left-lane law, which prohibits “impeding the flow of other traffic.”

“This a real big hot-button topic for the public at large right now,” says Trooper Cliff Pratt. “We’ve had a lot of complaints” from drivers who’ve had to deal with left-lane campers.

So far authorities have been gentle with the $124 ticket; the drivers stopped were given verbal warnings.

“We deal with it weekly,” Lt. George Brown, supervisor of public affairs for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, said of left-lane drivers going too slowly. He’s issued more warnings than tickets.

Insurers haven’t gotten aggressive yet, either, but this kind of ticket has the potential to raise rates.

“Any moving violation that applies points to a driver’s record could affect that driver’s car insurance rates,” says Susan Gallik Rouser, a spokeswoman for Progressive. “And because left-lane driving would be considered as such an infraction, we would take that into account when renewing a driver’s policy.”

What’s the law in your state?

The laws vary widely, according to John Carr, who works for a software company in the Boston area and who compiled a list of the rules in each state after taking an interest in the issue:

  • A few states — for instance, Kentucky, Maine Massachusetts and New Jersey — permit use of the left lane only for passing or turning left.
  • Georgia, Colorado and Louisiana follow the Uniform Vehicle Code, requiring drivers to keep right if they’re going slower than the speed of traffic.
  • Wyoming prohibits blocking the far left lane of a highway “for a prolonged period,” though it adds that the traffic should be “at a lawful rate of speed.”
  • In Arkansas and South Dakota, vehicles don’t have to stay right.
  • In Alaska, Maryland, North Carolina and Ohio, vehicles can drive in the left lane so long as they’re moving at the speed limit.
  • Florida is trying to join in: Lawmakers reintroduced a Road Rage Reduction Act this year, requiring motorists to stay out of the left lane on interstate highways except when passing. It passed the Legislature in 2005 but was vetoed by then-Gov. Jeb Bush, who questioned whether it was based on sound research.

‘One of my biggest pet peeves’

One of those exasperated drivers in your rearview mirror might be Eli Dozier.

“That’s one of my biggest pet peeves in the world, is when people stay in the left lane. They’re not passing, they’ve got people behind them, trying to go around, and they just cruise,” says Dozier, 31 and a stay-at-home dad.

“It’s probably the most uncourteous thing you can do,” he says, adding that it’s “obviously” unsafe.

“I’m a fast driver,” Dozier allows. “But if I’m not passing, I don’t use that left lane at all.”

So what’s a frustrated motorist to do?

Dozier heard in a chat room about some windshield decals that said “Slower Traffic,” with an arrow pointing to the right-hand lane, printed backward in large letters for reading in a rearview mirror. “And so I immediately ordered one. I jumped on it.”

He loves the thing. “Most people, it’s just inattentiveness” that keeps them in the passing lane, Dozier says. “Most people, when you pass them, they’ll give you a wave. They’re thankful” for the reminder.

At least, he says, women tend to be. Men sometimes take Dozier’s sticker as an affront and will retaliate by slowing down, he says. There have been some middle fingers, some choice words. And then, Dozier says, “I have been known to show them how good the back of my car looks.” At very close range. Which only exacerbates the situation.

Overall, though, both he and his wife are delighted with the results, he says. They recently bought her a Dodge Ram 1500 with a quad cab, and they’ve ordered a decal like his for it.

Pennsylvania authorities also find that reminders do work. “Anecdotally,” says Carl DeFebo of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Authority, “you do see a lot less people . . . enjoying the weather” in the passing lane since 25 signs went up on the turnpike in 2003 and 2004. It probably helps that “sometimes our police will actually enforce this,” DeFebo adds, handing out warnings or tickets that add up to $108.

Courtesy counts

The creator of those stickers, J.A. Tosti, is also director and founder of Left Lane Drivers of America. “What we’re seeking to do is raise awareness,” he explains.

A frustrating experience was a “Eureka!” moment for Tosti. “One day I was driving one of the local freeways in the area here — we’re not far from Portland (Ore.) — and I got behind a guy who was going slow in the left lane,” says Tosti. “And I got to thinking, boy, it sure would be nice if I could reach out and tap this guy on the shoulder and ask him to move over. And that’s when the light bulb went off.”

“It’s been a labor of love,” says Tosti, who didn’t disclose how many $29 stickers he’s sold. He would like to sell more to law-enforcement agencies.

Tosti said aggression only aggravates other drivers. For him, response to the decal on his car has always been positive and pleasant — in large part because he is a patient, nontailgating driver.

“It’s amazing how effective it is,” he says. “On one trip from Portland to Seattle, I felt at times like I was sweeping the left lane with a broom.”

A faster, more courteous — and well-swept — highway? Sounds like something most folks could live with.

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